Nuclear and non-humans

Missing the (Contaminated) Forest for the (Decontaminated) Trees in Fukushima: Prof Robert Jacobs

Missing the (Contaminated) Forest for the (Decontaminated) Trees in Fukushima: Prof Robert Jacobs

Abstract: This article explores how the models of medical risk from radiation established in the aftermath of the nuclear attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki are insufficient for understanding the risks faced by people in contaminated environments like Fukushima. These models focus exclusively on levels of external radiation, while the risk facedRead More

Courtesy: CNN

Nuclear Safety Regimes and India: What the Silence on the latest Fukushima Crisis Tells Us

Sonali Huria| The Leaflet  THE new year has begun on a grim note with a toxic gas leak at the Rourkela Steel Plant in Odisha on 6 January, which claimed the lives of four contractual workers. This is the latest in a disconcerting string of industrial accidents in India over the last fewRead More

Nuclear accidents, as seen through the history of water-related disasters

Nuclear accidents, as seen through the history of water-related disasters

Nuclear and water April 14, 2020 at 7:04 am 0 comments

This paper reinterprets the history of nuclear power as a history of water, and the history of nuclear accidents as a special case of droughts, floods, and other water-related disasters. The utmost importance of large-scale uninterrupted water flows for cooling nuclear facilities, and the need to simultaneously protect them from flooding and from contaminating their wet surroundings, have turned nuclear engineers into hydraulic engineers who interact with and transform nature in a variety of ways.

“My Fish is Your Fish”: A Must-Watch Short Film on Nuclear Contamination in Marshall Islands

“My Fish is Your Fish”: A Must-Watch Short Film on Nuclear Contamination in Marshall Islands

Nuclear and Animals, Nuclear Tests, Videos September 7, 2019 at 10:08 pm 0 comments

The film – My Fish is Your Fish – tells the story of nuclear weapons testing on the people and places of the Marshall Islands with interviews of survivors. It showcases the work of MISA in educating young people in particular about the nuclear legacy in their country and across the Pacific region, particularly through the interconnectedness of the oceans. It is moving and inspiring, and I hope you can share it with your supporters and promote the work of MISA.