Nuclear Accidents

Missing the (Contaminated) Forest for the (Decontaminated) Trees in Fukushima: Prof Robert Jacobs

Missing the (Contaminated) Forest for the (Decontaminated) Trees in Fukushima: Prof Robert Jacobs

Abstract: This article explores how the models of medical risk from radiation established in the aftermath of the nuclear attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki are insufficient for understanding the risks faced by people in contaminated environments like Fukushima. These models focus exclusively on levels of external radiation, while the risk facedRead More

Full text: Indian anti-nuclear groups’ statement on 10 years of the Fukushima accident

Full text: Indian anti-nuclear groups’ statement on 10 years of the Fukushima accident

​We, the members of various anti-Uranium mining, anti-nuclear power, anti-nuclear bomb groups and movements all over India, would like to express our solidarity with the people of Japan in the wake of the tenth anniversary of the Fukushima disaster. The Great East Japan Earthquake disaster had a 9 point (onRead More

Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster: The Definitive Story

Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster: The Definitive Story

Chernobyl, Nuclear Accidents, Videos July 5, 2020 at 11:40 pm 0 comments

The National Arts Club presents a conversation with Adam Higginbotham, author of “Midnight in Chernobyl: The Untold Story of the World’s Greatest Nuclear Disaster.” Higginbotham’s book is the definitive story of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, an “account that reads almost like the script for a movie.” (“The Wall Street Journal”).

Cosmos 954: The Nuclear-Powered Satellite That Fell From Space

Cosmos 954: The Nuclear-Powered Satellite That Fell From Space

Nuclear Accidents May 4, 2020 at 6:44 am 0 comments

On 24 January 1978, a few minutes before sunrise, Cosmos 954 entered the Earth’s atmosphere and broke up over Canada. Debris from the satellite fell along a 600-kilometer path from Great Slave Lake to Baker Lake, including portions of the Northwest Territories, Alberta, and Saskatchewan. The subsequent search and clean-up operation cost Canada nearly CA$14 million, while the US spent some USD 2.5 million. Canada later billed the Soviet Union CA$6 million, of which only half the amount was paid.