Seven Reasons Why Nuclear Waste Is Dangerous

Seven Reasons Why Nuclear Waste Is Dangerous

Ever since we have discovered how to harness the powerful energy contained within the nucleus of an atom, we have been using it – for both positive and negative purposes. Nuclear energy is an affordable, efficient and reliable option of generating power for many countries. But the dangerous side of the nuclear waste still casts a shadow over its widespread use. It is the troublesome disposal of the waste that remains an unsolved (perhaps even unsolvable) riddle.

 

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