Experts Suggest Clean Ways out of TN’s Electricity Shortage

Experts Suggest Clean Ways out of TN’s Electricity Shortage

It is possible for Tamil Nadu to overcome the current electricity crisis in the near term without relying on controversial large centralised projects, said experts who addressed students at a seminar organised by Loyola Enviro Club, the Indian Institute of Public Policy and the Chennai Solidarity Group. The seminar titled “Coal-free, Nuclear Free: Tamil Nadu’s Electricity Future Beyond 2050” emphasised that efficiency improvements, through reduction of losses during production, distirbution and consumption, combined with rationalised pricing and equitable electricity usage and renewable energy technologies can easily overcome the existing crisis and provide for the state’s future needs as well.

 

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